FASB Releases New Accounting Standard for Not-For-Profits


Shutterstock_238756393On August 18, 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued a standard that affects all not-for-profit entities issuing GAAP-basis financial statements. The new standard simplifies and improves how a not-for-profit entity classifies its net assets as well as the information it presents in financial statements and notes about its liquidity, financial performance and cash flows.

One goal of the standard is to improve how not-for-profits (like charities, foundations, colleges and universities, health care providers, religious organizations, trade associations and cultural institutions) communicate their financial performance and condition to their stakeholders.

 

Why a New Standard?

The current not-for-profit financial reporting model has held up well for more than 20 years, however, the FASB’s Not-for-Profit Advisory Committee and other stakeholders have reported that, while existing standards were sound, they could be improved to provide better information to users of not-for-profit financial statements.

Specifically, stakeholders voiced concerns about the following issues:

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5 Lessons Learned From CPAs #FirstSevenJobs


Thought bubbleEarlier this month Twitter user Marian Call, a singer-songwriter, started a viral trend when she tweeted her first seven jobs. Since then, social media has been all abuzz with users reminiscing about their #firstsevenjobs.

There’s no doubt that every job someone holds will teach them some kind of lesson. First jobs in particular teach those lessons in tough ways. To find out what lessons CPAs have learned, we put out a call for responses on social media; here’s what we heard.

Rand Gambrell

First seven jobs: Draftsman, McDonald’s Cook, Bus Boy, Wendy’s Cook, Bus Boy, Retail Sales, Hotel Sales Manager

Lesson learned: “No matter what your occupation or profession, perform your job to the best of your ability. People always recognize excellence.”

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Taxing Emotions: Death, Section 754 Elections and Serving the Client

Estate Planning 2Confronting the cold monetary and business realities of an estate is extraordinarily difficult in the midst of mourning. Even a well-planned estate’s complexity could mean the process drags on for months or even years, drawing out not only raw emotion but also tax exposure. Careful planning and a detailed explanation of your clients’ wishes are a must if you want to save their loved ones additional suffering.

My mother’s estate was moderate in terms of her personal holdings, but she also participated in substantial limited partnerships that passed to my brothers and me upon her death. While her home and personal effects were relatively simple to liquidate, the partnerships were a different matter.

There was no provision for a buyout of my mother’s interest upon her death. We found ourselves in business with people who didn’t know us, and had conflicting ideas about the future of the entity itself. Like so many partnerships, ours rarely had K-1s prepared in time to allow us to file our individual returns in advance of April 15th. We faced an indeterminate future of filing expensive extensions, estimating our individual tax liabilities and possibly increasing our exposure to an audit.

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5 Key Facts about the New FASB Leases Standard


Shutterstock_165181559What is a lease? And how should it be reported on a balance sheet? While your clients may not have spent much time pondering those questions in the past, the answers will take on new importance for them when a new Financial Accounting Standards Board standard on Leases becomes effective. While it’s true that the final guidance generally does not depart from existing GAAP as much as some earlier FASB proposals on this topic, practitioners should be prepared for significant changes in how all organizations that have lease assets—including private entities and not-for-profits—will account for leases. As practitioners begin to educate themselves on the guidance, here are five critical issues to keep in mind.  

  1. Lessees must now recognize operating lease assets and liabilities on the balance sheet. This is the most significant change, since it will require all organizations and their CPAs to take a different approach to lease accounting. Before this standard, U.S. GAAP only required this type of recognition for capital leases. Operating lease amounts were generally shown in the financial statements as rent expense on the income statement and in disclosures to the financial statements. In implementing the new guidance, entities will have to reconsider the ways they identify lease arrangements.

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Technology Revolutionizes the Transfer of Private Company Information

Shutterstock_104783210How can CPA firms, their clients and the investors and lenders with whom they do business easily access shared documents? How can CPA firms ensure that their signature won’t be used fraudulently or that there won’t be unauthorized changes in their financial reports? I spend a lot of time speaking with CPAs across the country, and these are some of the questions on the minds of firms that serve private company clients.

Public companies have a simple solution for sharing financial information in a secure environment. The Securities and Exchange Commission’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval (EDGAR) System collects, validates, indexes and forwards submissions from public companies’ SEC filings. It was launched in 1984 and offers public companies an efficient way to share corporate information, but there has never been a similar system to fit the needs of private companies. 

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