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9 posts from November 2014

Going out on a Limb for Tax Extenders

Tax blogAre we there yet?  Are we there yet?  Are we there yet? Are we there yet?

~ One of my grandsons

What’s the million dollar topic on members’ minds these days? It’s always a multiple choice with me so here you go:

1. The IRS

2. The congressional lame duck session

3. Extenders

4. Starting busy season

5. Government appropriations

6. Affordable Care Act compliance

 7. The Keystone Pipeline

8. Immigration reform

9. Bipartisan cooperation in Washington

10. All of the above

(Ed, why is “starting busy season” on your list?  When you were in practice, did you look forward to starting busy season?  And isn’t bipartisan cooperation in Washington an oxymoron?  What were you thinking?)

OK, fair enough, maybe not starting busy season, but busy season is a key to a successful practice year, and getting through it with fewer gray hairs wouldn’t hurt. (By the way, take a peek at our recent Tax Power Hour (for Tax Section members) for some tips.) 

I wish it were bipartisan cooperation, but the obvious answer is “extenders.”  We’re hearing from lots of members and rightfully so. Over 50 provisions expired last December.  Our tax advocacy team has been talking about those provisions on Capitol Hill for over a year.  And we recently sent in a letter about them.  IRS Commissioner Koskinen even asked for a copy of the letter to tout with members of Congress because of the IRS’ interest in getting off to a smooth and early start to filing season. Truth is, energy and immigration policy aren’t my thing but they really are intersecting with tax policy on Capitol Hill this year.  So what's the scoop?

The talk about quick passage of extenders is being replaced by congressional interest in smoothing the way for the Keystone Pipeline; indeed, legislation has passed in the House and Senate that the President has indicated would be vetoed (and they do not have enough votes to override the veto). And the President has acted on immigration issues through executive order; the Republicans have said such unilateral action could result in legal action to stop it.  And if that weren’t enough, there’s other legislation, such as the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act, that requires congressional attention; and even talk about letting the continuing resolution, the temporary government funding mechanism, expire on Dec. 11. It may not be a likely result but even a remote possibility of a government shutdown leading up to tax busy season is not good!

There has also been quite a bit of talk on dealing with extenders, which is good news.  Piecemeal or blanket extension?  One year or two? The House has been interested in the permanent extension of some provisions and a temporary extension of the remaining provisions, and the Senate leans “blanket.”  And lots of groups are posturing for something to happen - one broad coalition of business groups has urged Congress to act right away lest uncertainty and instability be injected into the marketplace.  Even outgoing Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp has said he thought the Democrats were acting in good faith.

But some would like to see provisions wither away on the vine, for example, retroactive extension of the decades old wind production tax credit has garnered a long and vocal list of opponents. And the President recently warned he would veto a congressional deal in the works, contending that it benefits corporations more than families.

However, there is still hope and I’m a glass-half-full type of guy so let me go out on a limb and give you my predictions (OK, maybe they’re wishes):

  • Congress will enact a two-year extension of the 2013 extenders - one year retroactively - during the lame duck session.
  • Congress will also pass another continuing resolution to fund government though busy season.
  • IRS will expeditiously finish the forms and complete programming and get things off to a smooth start.
  • The President and Congress will quietly work towards a bipartisan solution to immigration, energy issues and other items that need attention.

And a giant duck will land on the end of the limb I just went out on . . . is that a crack, I hear? (Ed, that wasn't just your grandson asking if “we're there yet;” it was all 400,000 of the AICPA’s members.)

Edward S. Karl, CPA, Vice President of Taxation, American Institute of CPAs

Going out on a limb image via Shutterstock

Happy Thanksgiving from AICPA Insights


LeavesWe are grateful to you, our readers. Your thought-provoking comments continue to spark interesting discussions and a lively sharing of opinions. Thank you for your readership.

We look forward to the next conversation – after the turkey and stuffing, of course! Enjoy this time with your family and friends, and have a safe and happy Thanksgiving holiday. 

 

 

7 Tips for Starting Your Own Practice

Starting LineEntrepreneurism is on the rise. With start-up fever igniting the Bay Area to the Chesapeake Bay what CPA hasn’t considered—even for a moment—starting his or her own firm? We each started our own firms and know firsthand about the advantages and challenges of venturing out on our own. A few months ago we participated in a live Facebook chat on how to start your own practice. Many of you joined us and asked great questions such as: What prompted you to start your practice? What is the best way to get your name out there? What were some of the unexpected challenges you encountered?

What’s our advice? Here are seven tips for starting your own firm:

Continue reading "7 Tips for Starting Your Own Practice" »

World Congress of Accountants 2014: Grande Successo!

ColosseumI’ve just returned from the World Congress of Accountants 2014 in Rome where the CGMA designation, powered by the AICPA and CIMA, served as the imperial and event app sponsor. I can tell you unequivocally, in English as well as Italian, that it was a great success!

WCOA is organized by the International Federation of Accountants and is held every four years. As lead sponsor, the event provided us the ultimate opportunity to showcase the CGMA designation, the US CPA credential, and the AICPA to an audience of nearly 4,000 professional accountants from around the globe.

At WCOA, we launched a series of reports and briefs that explore the latest trends shaping the future of business. Here’s a synopsis of those reports:

Continue reading "World Congress of Accountants 2014: Grande Successo!" »

Get Ready for the Medicare Open Enrollment Deadline

Elderly couple receiving financial adviceCPA financial planners and others who advise clients on healthcare and estate planning issues will want to know that the Medicare annual open enrollment period runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2014.

Many people understand they can switch from their 2014 standalone Part D prescription drug plan to a new standalone plan for 2015. Medicare beneficiaries can also drop their Part D coverage altogether, although this is not a good move unless you are moving from traditional Medicare to a Medicare Advantage plan with a prescription drug feature.

Medicare beneficiaries can also do the following:

1. Change from traditional Medicare to a Medicare Advantage plan.

2. Go from a Medicare Advantage plan to traditional Medicare, although the choices may be limited when it comes to finding a Medicare Supplement plan.

3. Transfer from their current Medicare Advantage plan to a new Medicare Advantage plan for 2015.

4. Move from a Medicare Advantage plan without prescription drug coverage to a plan that offers prescription drug coverage. Note that the Medicare beneficiary can also move from a Medicare Advantage plan that offers prescription drug coverage to one that does not.

Continue reading "Get Ready for the Medicare Open Enrollment Deadline" »

Employers’ Denial of ACA Impact Could Cost Them a Fortune

ACA-Image 600x600In all of my dealings with employers on Affordable Care Act (ACA) matters since 2010, I’ve reached a few reasonably sound conclusions.  Here’s one: employers are faking it!  They are doing so when it comes to how IRS controlled group rules influence the ACA’s “Applicable Large Employer” (ALE) determination.  It is this determination that serves as a foundational component of the ACA’s Employer Shared Responsibility (“pay or play”) mandate.  To recap, employers of 50 or more full-time equivalent employees (100 or more for 2015) are expected to offer ACA compliant coverage (play) or pay assessable payments.  The amounts of these payments are based on factors that include the number of full-time employees and how many of them qualify for Exchange-based premium subsidies.

Continue reading "Employers’ Denial of ACA Impact Could Cost Them a Fortune" »

8 Tips to Becoming Your Clients’ “Advisor of Choice”

Over the past three decades, a growing number of CPAs expanded their service offerings beyond tax compliance to help individuals and families address and plan for all aspects of their financial lives. These aspects might include paying for children’s education, transferring wealth, protecting assets, funding retirement and more. Trusted-adviser_2

As CPA financial planners help their clients realize their long-term goals, this expansion of service offerings opens up new revenue streams and deepens client relationships.

Earlier this year, as part of the AICPA’s PFP Section’s CPA Financial Planning Thought Leadership series, I moderated the webcast, “Being an Advisor of Choice.” Panelists shared their perspectives on working with individual and closely held business clients, the benefits of this expanded business model to the practitioner and firm and the outlook for maintaining this model. (See the note at the end of this blog post about how to download a recording of the webcast.)

During the webcast, we discussed a great deal of information. Here is a quick rundown of eight ways you can become your clients’ “advisor of choice.” How many of these are you already doing and how many would you like to accomplish?

1. Add Financial Planning to Your Practice

Tax compliance is becoming a commodity. Integrating financial planning into your practice offers a chance to make a deeper connection with clients, requiring you to give objective advice and keep clients’ best interests at the forefront.

2. Determine Your Value Proposition

When you add financial planning to your practice, you also add value, but you figure out what kind of value you want to add in order to grow your bottom line. The last thing you want to do is become just another firm offering the same services as everyone else.

3. Avoid Becoming a One Trick Pony Advisor

Clients are outgrowing the services of mono-line advisors. If you were simply a specialist in tax or investments, your clients will grow beyond your services.

4. Know Your Strengths

Position yourself as the advisor of choice. You have an excellent professional reputation, offer high quality professional advice and possess transferable skills that are diverse and applicable to various client situations.

5. It’s all About the Relationship

Deepen and enhance the relationships you have with existing clients who already understand your role as their advisor of choice. You may even need to reposition yourself with existing clients, particularly CFOs or controllers who retain you just for audit work or corporate compliance.

6. Listen to Your Clients

Competent advisors do their best work when they sit down with their clients to let them voice their concerns about the current financial world they live in. Listen for issues you can help understand and solve.

7. Build on Your Three Distinguishing Qualities

As a financial professional, you are competent and objective and maintain the highest integrity. Remember these qualities and seize the best opportunities you can.

8. Break the Mold

Advisors who are willing to address the wide range of issues that come into play and work with their clients and other specialists to serve their needs will be in a great position to be a strong, key resource.

AICPA PFP Section’s Thought Leadership Series

Access the free webcast recordings and presentation materials from the AICPA PFP Section’s Thought Leadership series featuring forward thinking from CPA financial planners advising their clients in tax, estate, retirement, risk management and investments. Two panels will host free thought leadership webcasts on November 12th and 13th covering investments and the outlook for the CPA financial planning profession.

 

Lyle Benson, CPA/PFS, CFP®, President and Founder, L.K. Benson & Company. Based in Baltimore, Lyle’s firm specializes in personal financial planning, tax and investment advisory services for high income individuals and families, as well as corporate executives and entrepreneurial, closely held business owners across the country. Lyle is chair of the AICPA’s PFP Executive Committee.

 Financial planning image via Shutterstock

 

AICPA in the News: Personal Finance Tips from CPAs

CPA Web-PFS_center_1cCPAs provide tremendous value in the area of financial planning by helping clients understand changes in laws, as well as trends which can affect their bottom line. Serving as trusted advisors, CPAs who work in personal financial planning are able to tailor their advice to meet the changing needs of their clients in an ever fluctuating economy.

Below are a few recent media articles highlighting the guidance of CPAs.

Jerry Love, CPA/PFS, responded to a Kiplinger’s Personal Finance reader who asked how to save for retirement if their employer doesn’t offer a 401(k).

If you have an eligible health insurance policy with at least a $1,250 deductible -- or $2,500 for family coverage -- you can contribute to a health savings account, said Love. You can contribute up to $3,300 in 2014 if you have individual coverage, or $6,550 for family coverage (plus $1,000 if 55 or older). Contributions are tax-deductible (or pretax) and can be used tax-free for medical expenses in any year.

Newsday reports that, with mortgage rates hovering around 4 percent, many Americans are considering purchasing a home. However, it is important to not rush to a lender until you're creditworthy. The best way to do that is to raise your credit score. AICPA member Kelley Long, CPA/PFS, advised that not applying for other loans or opening new credit cards would be one way to avoid damaging your credit score. In addition, not closing cards is a prudent step, because it reduces your available credit and therefore boosts the percentage of available credit your other cards represent.

A recent FoxBusiness.com article relied upon the expertise of two CPAs to shed light on the havoc financial fraud can cause the elderly. “If you’re 20 [years old] and something happens to you financially, you have a long time to make a difference “If you’re older and not able to go back to work and recover, having fraud perpetrated on you can significantly change the rest of your life,” said Mackey McNeill, CPA/PFS.

It can be difficult for those who are worried about their elders to gain more insight into their financial decisions to help prevent fraud, but Leonard Wright, CPA/PFS advises that effective communication can help break through. “There are ways to communicate with the elderly so they don’t feel like you’re taking over, said Wright. Tell your elderly loved ones that you can get a second opinion with finances just like you do with doctors.” This could also mean explaining the importance of calling another family member before sending any money to a third party or agreeing to a new contract, credit card or investment.

James Schiavone, Media Relations Manager, American Institute of CPAs. 

12 Planning Tips for Social Security Benefits

Social-security-word-cloudHelping clients plan for Social Security benefits may involve a lot of information gathering and research, but doing so could save them a heap of headaches and a lot of money. Here are 12 planning tips that stand out to me as potential opportunities. These can provide great relief and keep your clients out of the danger zone.

Continue reading "12 Planning Tips for Social Security Benefits" »

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