28 posts categorized "Culture" Feed

8 Reasons to Get Excited About Fall

GourdsNow that I’m almost done drying my tears because summer is over (but I’m keeping a few tissues handy just in case), I’m ready to make a confession: I secretly love fall. Anyone who has met me for more than 10 minutes knows I never miss an opportunity to crow about how summer is the perfect season and how anyone who doesn’t like the beach is hardwired wrong. So I kind of feel like a fraud admitting I really like fall. But there’s just something about it that makes me nostalgic.

Here are eight reasons why fall really is fabulous.

  1. Apple picking and cider donuts

The annual family apple picking trips of my youth are magical in my memories—tractor rides into the orchard, farm stands, the discovery of the world’s greatest cider donuts (no really, I’ve never had a better one). The mere thought of it all gets me wistful. Taking my son for the first time (okay, the second time—the first time he was a month old) brought me great joy. This year we introduced our daughter to the apple picking tradition.

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Why Pets Make the Best Coworkers

Peaches - Julia MorrissMy dog Peaches, a cuddly beagle mix, is the love of my life. As with most pet owners, I spend a lot of time with my dog and miss her when I’m not at home. The days that I telecommute are often the highlight of my week because I can relish her company all day. Having a dog at home is beneficial in many ways:  I stand up and walk around more often, get outside for fresh air a few times a day and feel less stressed because I can give Peaches regular snuggles.

One of the benefits of being a CPA sole practitioner, or working for a firm that utilizes virtual offices, is that you can often work from home, allowing you to be with your pets all day. Some CPA firms even allow employees to bring their dogs to the office.

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8 Ways Reading Can Help You Get Ahead at the Office

BookReading is good for your career. Don’t believe me? Think of all the successful people who make reading a priority – Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, Mark Cuban, Warren Buffet and Mark Zuckerburg, to name a few. And they aren’t just reading Facebook updates, emails and tweets. They are committing time to reading actual books.

Why does reading a book matter? The benefits are plentiful and aren’t just limited to reading non-fiction. One important way reading helps your career is by helping you develop empathy. When you connect with a character and begin to understand their feelings and emotions, you are increasing your empathy. You gain valuable exposure to other perspectives, which can help you better relate to your coworkers and clients.

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Help After a Hurricane: Disaster Resources

Hurricane reliefCPAs are no strangers to helping: it is what they do every day for their clients, the public, small businesses and others. As those affected by recent hurricanes or other disasters begin the arduous process of recovery, there are things the CPA community can do to help those living and working in affected areas—including fellow CPAs—get back on their feet. We’ve compiled a list of resources, articles and more to aid in the recovery from this unfortunate disaster.

AICPA Benevolent Fund

If you are facing financial hardship because of a hurricane or other disaster, you can apply for assistance.

Want to help? You can make a charitable contribution to the fund.

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11 Things to Know About Gen Z Workers

Gen ZJust when you thought you were beginning to understand Millennials, it’s time to prepare for Gen Z to enter the workforce and they’re very different from their predecessors. Born between 1994-2010, this generation is known by many names—Post-Millennials, iGeneration, Founders, Plurals, Homeland Generation and Gen Z. Just like the generations before them, the characteristics of Gen Z are shaped by parenting trends, historical events and technology.

Gen Z are the children of Gen X, a cohort that was thought to be skeptical and perhaps even cynical in their youth as they came of age post-Watergate and post-Vietnam. Yet, Gen X has grown up to be balanced and healthy despite facing the strains of the Great Recession of 2008. As parents, Gen X have been concerned about raising their children in a safe environment, which has led Gen Z to be more cautious than previous generations. Other major influences shaping their development and world views include the Great Recession, the War on Terror, the first African American president and the legalization of gay marriage. But, probably the most significant factor is the advent of the smartphone.

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Tips for Eclipse 2017

EclipseOn Monday, August 21, a total solar eclipse will move across 14 states of the country. The last time this was visible in the United States was on February 26, 1979. The next won’t happen until October of 2023. Given their rarity, it’s understandable why a total eclipse has people excited and even taking time off from work to watch.

Even if you’re not in the path of the total eclipse, you’ll at least be able to see a partial eclipse from most places in the U.S. Below are some tips to prepare for the event and make the most of your experience.

Check what you’ll see in your location.

Take a look at this website prior to the eclipse to see what percentage of the eclipse you’ll be able to view. The website recommends looking at multiple zip codes around you to make sure you get the best view possible. This will also determine if you want to make travel arrangements or stay put.

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How Relaxation Can Improve Concentration

RelaxIt’s not surprising that National Relaxation Day (Aug. 15) is observed in the thick of summer because, for many, ideal relaxation involves lounging on a tropical beach and just feeling away from it all. For me, however, snowboarding is a great way to relax. When I’m carving down a beautiful snow-covered mountain, I’m able to allow my concerns to drift off into the background. From these two examples, it’s plain to see that perceptions of what constitutes relaxation vary.

Relaxation does not inherently require us to be inactive or unplugged from our normal routine. Perhaps you make room in your weekly schedule to take a morning run, practice yoga or spend some time in your garden. These activities may be great when we can engage in them, but how can we find other ways to help us relax the rest of the time, which is most often spent at work? One way to find some space and peace, no matter where we are, is through the practice of mindfulness.

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Plan Smart: Banishing Time Wasters

“I cannot make my days longer so I strive to make them better.” –Henry David Thoreau

Time wastersTime is money

We’ve heard the proverb many times. But when it comes to balancing client needs along with all of the nuances of leadership in a practice, time often really IS money. How many times have you looked at the clock and realized the day was half over before you’d had a chance to accomplish even a fraction of what you’d initially planned? A 2014 study found that only 13% of advisers report feeling in complete control of their time. Alarmingly, an overwhelming number of professionals frequently experience time drains that inhibit their relationships with clients, the growth of their business, and their own personal and professional productivity. Thankfully, there are some very easy-to-implement solutions that most CPAs can put into practice today to combat the time wasters in their daily schedule.

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Is Watching Shark Week Deadlier than Actual Sharks?

SharkAs a child, I loved watching movies about summer vacations. To someone from a low-income household whose summer adventures were circumscribed to the occasional elementary school-run day camp, the idea of vacationing was exotic – regardless of whether the family went to Walley World (National Lampoon’s Summer Vacation) or to a charming Massachusetts beach town like Amity (JAWS). Even the latter, where an insatiable Great White swallows poor beachgoers whole, seemed preferable to languishing away hours reading comics in my sweltering bedroom, ignoring my mom’s relentless nagging to ‘go play outside.’

 Although many cast JAWS aside as simply a horror movie, to me, it’s always been much more. It’s a classic-if-not-quintessential man vs. beast odyssey, not much unlike those found in Greek mythology. But whether you classify the film as horror or adventure, JAWS undeniably plays to certain fears. Galeophobia (the fear of sharks) is akin to a fear of the dark in that it taps into an anxiety of being unable to see those things which may harm us. In terms of sharks, however, this fear is largely misguided.

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Beyond Bad Jokes: What We Learned from Our Dads

Pop culture would have us believe dads are all lawn obsessed, bad joke telling, tacky sweater wearing, voicemail leaving technological disasters. (Not mine, of course. My dad’s sweaters are perfectly acceptable, but he prefers to rock navy blue crew neck sweatshirts that have been aged to perfection.) But beneath their quirks (and I’ve yet to meet a dad without a quirk or 12) dads are often dishing out great advice or leading by example. In honor of Father’s Day, my colleagues and I share what we’ve learned from our dads:

SamanthaSamantha Delgado, Manager – Communications, PR & Corporate Responsibility:

My dad raised me to be independent and hard-working, always saying that if I want something, to go out and get it myself because “no one else is going to do it for you.” Most importantly, he instilled in me the importance of family, and being there for each other through thick and thin. Happy Father’s Day!  

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Tips for Stress-Free Summer Travel

TravelAt long last, the winter coats have been washed and relegated to the back of the closet (or they’ll sit on the laundry room floor until next October waiting to be washed—don’t worry, I don’t judge) and you’re thinking about your summer travel plans. Perhaps you’d like to spend a glorious week at the beach, or take a road trip to visit historical sites. Maybe a lake house is your thing, or you’re jetting half way around the world to stay in an overwater bungalow in the Maldives* before they sink. It doesn’t matter whether your vacation will be via the family SUV or a private jet, there will be some element of drudgery—finalizing itineraries, packing, renting cars, making reservations. And if you’re traveling with young kids, face it: you’re going on a trip, not a vacation. The good news is that there are ways to minimize your vacation stress from the planning stages through the duration of your trip, no matter your destination or the company you keep.

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Just Kidding: Humor at Work

HumorI bought the world’s worst thesaurus yesterday. Not only is it terrible, it’s terrible.

I recently read a CGMA Magazine article which reported that more than 75 percent of CFOs in an Accountemps survey said that an employee’s sense of humor was very or somewhat important for fitting into the company’s corporate culture. I was intrigued by this and inspired to do a little more research on the importance of comedy in the workplace and what I could be doing to add a little levity to my remit. Here’s what I found:

  • There’s a reason we call funny people “witty;” a good sense of humor makes you appear more competent and confident
  • Research suggests that teams who joke more, communicate better (WSJ)
  • It matters what “kind” of funny you are, always be authentic and humble (HBR)
  • Use the right medium; humor rarely goes well over email (CGMA Magazine)
  • It’s OK to tell an unfunny joke; it’s not OK to tell an inappropriate joke (HBR)

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Thanks, Mom: What We Learned from Our Mothers

It might take 20 (or 30 or 40) years, but eventually, most people recognize that between telling you to pick up/put away/tuck in/eat/clean/don’t stay out too late, your mom probably imparted you with some pretty good wisdom. In honor of Mother’s Day, we asked people to share what they’ve learned from their mothers.

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How One CPA Got the Chance to Edit the Journal of Accountancy

Lindsay StevensonHave you ever wanted to try something completely opposite from your everyday norm? Maybe BASE jumping from a mountain or zip-lining through the jungle? For me, writing and journalism have always been that out-of-the-ordinary experience that would be radically different from my everyday CPA-related work. (Don’t judge; it can be as exciting as BASE jumping in some circles!)

So when the team at the AICPA’s Journal of Accountancy (JofA) reached out and asked me to join a small group of young CPAs to guest edit the May 2017 issue, I jumped at the chance.

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Thriving with Autism: One CPA's Story

Tom IlandAccording to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), one in every 68 American children is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). A newer government survey boosts the prevalence of this condition to one in 45 children. Though the frequency of autism remains debatable, it’s undeniably among the fastest-growing developmental disorders in the U.S., with diagnoses having increased 119.4% since 2000.

Now, pivot to the inevitability of Generation Z, post-millennial youths constituting 20% of the workforce by 2020. When you consider the staggering prevalence of autism in this particular age group and combine those occurrences with the even more daunting unemployment rate of people with autism, the implication for our economy’s future is alarming.

Enter: Tom Iland, who at 13 was diagnosed with autism. Affectionately called The Calculator by his junior high schoolmates, Tom discovered at a very young age that, despite certain shortcomings, he was a wiz with numbers. Among his many mathematical talents, he can – in no more than a second – provide the sum of a word by adding its letters’ corresponding numerical values:

If A=1, B=2…Z=26, then autism = 83.

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Employers: 5 Tips to Make Work from Home Policies Successful

Part II

Remote workersWorking from home brings with it a special set of challenges and benefits for employees, covered in Part 1 of this series. But what if you’re the employer? An increasing number of employers – from boutique firms to huge organizations – offer their employees everything from flexible work arrangements to full-time remote work. Many have found that with the right protocols in place, flexible work arrangements benefit employers as well.

Increasingly Small World 

There’s an online video featuring two co-workers...they walk, stop for coffee, cab to work…they’re apparently working on a project together. At first they seem to be in the same place at the same time. Then it hits you – the locales are different, the cultures are different, even the time zones. But when they work, they work as one.

This concept of working together from a variety of locations has been around for years – particularly for CPA practices. Many small, medium and large firms have incorporated the idea of a remote workforce. Technology has completely changed the profession by [more easily linking employees and in] opening up new ways to add value for practices, employers, employees and even clients.

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5 Tips to Make Working from Home Successful

Part I

Working from homeBy now you’ve probably seen the viral video that made Marion Kelly, 4, the poster girl for working from home gone (adorably) awry. A boisterous Kelly gleefully bounced into her father’s home office in South Korea while he was being interviewed by BBC on live television. A secondary star of the interview? Her little brother James who rolled into the frame in his walker, quickly followed by their flustered, horrified mother who scooped them up and retreated.

Over the past decade, flexible work arrangements have become increasingly common. Employees are no longer expected in the office Monday through Friday without question. The prevalence of widely accessible Wi-Fi, video conferencing, and web-based work-sharing tools make working remotely relatively painless. But if you ask anyone who has worked from home with some degree of regularity, they will each have their own Marion Kelly story for you—an interrupting child, a home repair disaster, Wi-Fi disruptions. Life happens.

To make working from home as seamless as possible, there are steps you can take to optimize your remote work set up.

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4 Simple Ways to Squeeze in Exercise During Busy Season

ExerciseDuring tax season, accountants become accustomed to burning the midnight oil. Our long days turn into nights and nights into weekends. In the midst of our busy routines, it’s hard enough to balance career, family and a multitude of other obligations, let alone give adequate attention to physical exercise.

Carving out time for regular exercise is vital. Not only does it come with a variety of health benefits, but it also helps your mind work more efficiently. By investing in yourself and devoting energy to daily exercise, you will reap the rewards of better physical and emotional health as well as enhanced cognitive function – something we all need in order to conquer the busy season.

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Three Tips for Effectively Managing Remote Teams

Working remotelyWith business continuing to expand globally, leaders need to exercise new management skills in order to effectively engage an increasingly remote and diverse workforce. <click to tweet> In an article for CGMA Magazine, Dan Griffiths, CPA, CGMA, director of strategy and leadership at Tanner LLC, says, “One challenge of managing decentralized workers is giving them a sense of inclusion. Their in-person interaction is limited, but there are ways to make them feel like part of the team.” Read on for three tips from profession leaders on effectively managing remote workers:

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Recipe for a Delicious Holiday, AICPA Style

Crumb cakeThanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, New Years. Late fall and early winter are choc-a-bloc with holidays and, thus, opportunities to entertain and cook for friends and family. Some people like to stick with their tried and true holiday recipes year after year. Others are always looking for something new to serve. And if you've been invited somewhere as a guest, you might be looking for just the right thing to bring to a party or holiday gathering.

AICPA staff and affiliates gathered some favorite recipes from aunts, uncles, or in my case, my second grade class in elementary school. We hope this collection of old favorites is helpful—and tasty. And as one colleague suggested, if toiling in the kitchen isn't your thing, you can always make reservations!

Happy Holidays!

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Thank a Veteran Today, Help Veterans Year Round

American Flag

It is relatively easy to take time out of your day to acknowledge our veterans—in person or on social media—and say thanks to those who bravely and proudly served our nation. There are some CPAs who have found ways to give even more to our veterans. AICPA Insights recently spoke with former AICPA Chairman Ernie Almonte, CPA, CGMA, who has volunteered extensively with Operation Stand Down Rhode Island, a veteran’s organization in his home state of Rhode Island, about his experiences.

AICPA Insights: Why did you get involved in working with veterans?

Ernie Almonte: I have always been interested in history.  The more I learned about history the more I realized the important role veterans play in our freedom. As a participant of the Marine Corps ROTC program in high school, as a son of a U.S. Marine veteran from the Korean War and a member of a family that has lost relatives and friends in various wars fighting for our freedom, I felt an overwhelming need to give back.

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It’s Hurricane Season. Are You Prepared?

HurricaneTropical Storm Hermine may do more than ruin your Labor Day Weekend plans. After battering Florida’s gulf coast as the first hurricane to make landfall in 11 years, the weakened-but-still-potent storm is set to make a run up the East Coast. And in the Pacific, Hawaii is bracing for Hurricane Lester. The aftereffects of both storms may cause heavy rains, high winds and rough surf that will wreak havoc on travel plans and barbeques, could down trees and powerlines, and cause structural damage to buildings. The best thing you can do? Be prepared.

So what do you and your family need?

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Gwen Jorgensen: From Tax Accountant to Olympic Gold Medalist

Gwen jorgensenIt’s not every day a tax accountant from Wisconsin wins a gold medal at the Olympics. But on Saturday, Aug. 20, Gwen Jorgensen, formerly of the EY corporate tax group in Milwaukee, became the first U.S. woman to do just that. Crossing the finish line with a time of 1:56:16, Jorgensen won gold in the triathlon.

Jorgensen, who earned a master’s degree in accounting at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and passed the CPA exam, didn’t even take up triathlon until after college. Jorgensen was a runner and swimmer in college, and was approached by USA Triathlon looking for college athletes they thought would be successful in the sport. At the time they contacted Jorgensen, she was still in school and had an offer from EY. She turned USA Triathlon down, but they convinced her to at least try triathlon as a hobby while she worked for EY. And, thus, a grueling schedule began: waking at 4 a.m. to ride her bike to the pool, swimming, and getting to the office at 8 a.m. After work, Jorgensen trained some more. And found that she loved triathlon.

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5 Tips to Maximize Productivity - Both at Home and at Work

Shutterstock_438684127“Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.” ― Stephen King 

Whether it be racing to the office to conquer the business world, or managing all of our other daily commitments, we work hard every single day. And it’s not easy to stay productive with conflicting priorities. 

To keep you on track (and your sanity intact), below are five tips to inspire productivity at home and at work. 

(1) Don’t Be Afraid to Say “No.” 

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs put it the best. ”Focusing is about saying no.” From a professional standpoint, in order to truly do your job and meet your objectives, every time someone asks you to do something, you need to evaluate whether you are the best person to be doing that job, or even whether it should be done at all. Many of us are people pleasers and want to help, but saying “yes” is not necessarily the best thing for you or the organization. 

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3 Things to Keep When You Tackle Clutter

Shutterstock_375900517The world now seems chockful of tips to streamline your desk, your home and even your life. This isn’t a bad thing. For CPAs, the files pile up fast. Not to mention the articles, notes, e-mails and phone messages.

At home, the challenge to keep a grip on all the stuff can be even bigger with old clothes, shoes, sports equipment, tchotchkes and other stuff.  The cappuccino maker that your brother-in-law bought you is collecting dust but you feel guilty giving it away.  Or, in the case of my parents, it was books, tons of them. “They were like houseguests who never left,” my brother observed.  In her bestseller, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing,” Marie “KonMari” Kondo advises getting rid of things that don’t bring you joy.

Being surrounded by useless things, be they old magazines or appliances or clothes, can be draining. I am a big fan of regular (ok, semi-regular) sweeps to free up visual space, bringing an “ah” feeling to your eyes and brain. However, I want to caution you in your zeal to unclutter to consider keeping a few items that you may regret tossing later.  With all due respect to Kondo, it doesn’t have to bring you joy, but provide a crucial link with a person or memory you cherish.

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Summer Reading Recommendations

Summer readingPart I

Nothing says summer vacation like a few good beach (or mountain, lake, backpacking… you get the picture…) reads. The AICPA Communications staff joined forces to present you with a diverse collection of books we think will make your summer vacation, wherever that may be, even more enjoyable.

Christopher Almonte, Manager, Communications recommends:

  • The Innovator: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Isaacson (2014)

From the author who wrote the biography of Steve Jobs comes the story of how computers and the internet were created.

  • David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants by Malcolm Gladwell (2013)

Challenge how you think about obstacles, disadvantages and setbacks to reshape the way you think of the world around you.

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Prince’s $250 Million Mistake

PrinceWith songs like “Purple Rain” and “Little Red Corvette,” Prince wrote the soundtrack of a generation.

However, his failure to write a will could spell trouble for his $250 million fortune. Last week, people around the world mourned the death of this gifted singer and songwriter, and many were shocked to hear that Prince didn’t have a will or an estate plan in place. Even though he was a notoriously hands-on negotiator who meticulously controlled the intellectual property rights of his song collection, this unfortunate lack of planning has left uncertainty for Prince’s heirs. The future inheritance process could cost tens of millions of dollars in legal fees, and state and federal estate taxes. Surprisingly, he’s not the first famous person who left this world without a plan.

Not yet famous with a quarter billion dollar estate to leave loved ones? It’s still important to draft a will and keep it up-to-date based on changing personal and financial situations. Here are a few tips to make sure you have an effective will:

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Chinese New Year Brings Business Relationship Lessons: 12 Tips

Chinatown londonChinese New Year, sometimes known as Spring Festival, is a centuries-old celebration of the lunar New Year. Widely celebrated in China, the festival is the pinnacle event of the year, also honored across Asia, particularly in areas with large Chinese populations, including Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia and the Philippines. It is considered a major holiday in Chinese culture, and is a time for families to be together.

If you have clients or co-workers in China or of Chinese descent you may want to learn about do’s and don’ts during next week’s Chinese New Year, which begins officially Monday, Feb. 8 and lasts for two weeks. The holiday really kicks off on Sunday, with the traditional New Year’s dinner, which is thought to be the most important meal of the year.

Whether you have colleagues who celebrate Chinese New Year or not, this list of do’s and don’ts can help you have a luck-filled New Year.

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