Financial Literacy Feed

financial literacy

The AICPA and its members continue to be at the forefront of the financial literacy movement with free programs, resources and thousands of CPAs across all 50 states volunteering to help Americans with their financial understanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

When it comes to Financial Literacy, Small Steps Add Up Quick

Stacking cake

When I was just starting out my career, I was in the same boat financially as a lot of recent college graduates. My primary focus was making ends meet. For me, this meant making decisions about how much I could afford for rent and managing my day-to-day expenses so that bills got paid on time.

In the back of my mind, I understood that my student loans and a few thousand dollars in high interest credit card debt also needed to be addressed, and that paying the monthly minimum was a bad look. In those days saving for retirement and building up a nest egg was a nice, if seemingly unattainable idea, like summering in the South of France or playing professional baseball. Surely there are people who do these things, but I had no idea how they made it happen.

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Prince’s $250 Million Mistake

PrinceWith songs like “Purple Rain” and “Little Red Corvette,” Prince wrote the soundtrack of a generation.

However, his failure to write a will could spell trouble for his $250 million fortune. Last week, people around the world mourned the death of this gifted singer and songwriter, and many were shocked to hear that Prince didn’t have a will or an estate plan in place. Even though he was a notoriously hands-on negotiator who meticulously controlled the intellectual property rights of his song collection, this unfortunate lack of planning has left uncertainty for Prince’s heirs. The future inheritance process could cost tens of millions of dollars in legal fees, and state and federal estate taxes. Surprisingly, he’s not the first famous person who left this world without a plan.

Not yet famous with a quarter billion dollar estate to leave loved ones? It’s still important to draft a will and keep it up-to-date based on changing personal and financial situations. Here are a few tips to make sure you have an effective will:

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Make Every Day Earth Day and Save Two Kinds of Green

Earth DayWhere I live in Queens, New York, recycling is mandatory. My husband and I keep a plastic sorting bin with two compartments—one for glass and plastic, the other for paper and cardboard—right next to our garbage can to make things easy…and messy, since our almost 20-month-old son thinks that the cardboard recycling is there for his entertainment. But a little mess in our living room is a small price to pay to help the planet. While recycling has become common practice in many parts of the United States, there are so many other things you can do that will help both the earth and your bottom line, and, in some cases, offer a tax break.

Water Conservation

  • Shut off the tap when brushing your teeth. Doing this twice a day saves up to 8 gallons of water.
  • Install low-flow shower heads in bathrooms.
  • If remodeling, consider low-flow toilets. These give the user the option of how much water will be used to flush based on the amount of waste.
  • Don’t buy disposable water bottles. Instead fill reusable water bottles.
  • Be sure sprinkler systems won’t go off when it has rained or during the sunniest times of the day and be mindful of drought conditions.
  • When running water to wash dishes, collect the initial cool water to water houseplants.

Potential cost savings: A family of four that upgrades and optimizes their water usage can save nearly $300 a year in utility bills and 32,000 gallons of water.  For more tips on water conservation and to calculate how much you might save, visit the Environmental Protection Agency website.

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The Growing Importance of Financial Literacy Month

Fin lit 2Every second, America’s trillion dollar student loan debt grows by nearly $3,000. This debt that people begin to carry at an early age often leads to more uninformed financial decisions, such as taking on credit card debt and other loans they can’t afford. Typically, this occurs because of limited access to financial education tools and resources. This alone points to the urgent need for financial literacy in this country.

The AICPA and state CPA societies across the country are leading the effort to address this growing problem through new programs and initiatives. April is Financial Literacy Month, and we continue to be diligent in spreading the important message of financial literacy to millions of Americans. Through the AICPA’s flagship 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy program, the national volunteer effort of CPAs to help all Americans understand their personal finances through every life stage, we have combined grassroots advocacy with free public resources and tools for CPAs to educate Americans of all ages. Additionally, Feed the Pig, the AICPA’s award-winning public service campaign with the Ad Council, has provided tools and resources aimed specifically at Americans aged 25-34, an age group that is making major life decisions, often with little financial experience or guidance.

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What’s a Hooraycation, and How Can I Go on One?

GalapagosGetting Away from it All After Busy Season: Trips for Any Budget

As busy season finally draws to a close, your senses dulled by long nights staring at a monitor and routing through piles of disorganized receipts, you might understandably be thinking about taking a well-earned break. Recharging your batteries, getting acquainted once again with those people who share your house and enjoying a few days of relaxation mean different things to different people, but in the end it always comes down to budget. Here are three family-friendly vacation types you can plan today, designed for modest, moderate and extreme budgets.

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