Financial Literacy Feed

financial literacy

The AICPA and its members continue to be at the forefront of the financial literacy movement with free programs, resources and thousands of CPAs across all 50 states volunteering to help Americans with their financial understanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The Importance of Financial Literacy Month

Fin Lit Month 2015 2In a few short months, millions of new college graduates will enter the job market with an average of $30,000 in student loans. Student loan default rates are rising as recent graduates struggle to pay down their debt. The reason? New graduates will have degrees that have prepared them for careers or graduate school, but most will not have the knowledge to make sound financial decisions. That is why financial literacy is so important.

April is Financial Literacy Month and this year the AICPA marks the occasion with a renewed sense of purpose. With CPAs as our champions, the AICPA has advanced the financial literacy cause for over a decade, and we will continue to provide leadership in improving the financial understanding of future generations. It is critical not only for their individual success, but for the financial success of our country. For more than 10 years, the AICPA, its members and state CPA societies have been leaders in financial literacy by providing free programs, tools and resources for consumers, educators and more.  The AICPA’s flagship 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy program is the national volunteer effort of CPAs to help all Americans understand their personal finances through every life stage. The program combines grassroots advocacy with free public resources and tools for CPAs to educate Americans of all ages. In addition, Feed the Pig, the AICPA’s award-winning public service campaign with the Ad Council, provides tools and resources aimed specifically at Americans aged 25-34, an age group that is making major life decisions, often with little financial experience or guidance.

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Broadening Our Definition of Financial Literacy

Micpa-logo-Here at the Michigan Association of CPAs, we’ve embarked on some projects that go beyond the traditional approach to financial literacy. We’ve had the fantastic opportunity to work with Michigan’s Governor Rick Snyder, CPA on several initiatives aimed at our most vulnerable populations, including Reinventing Mi Retirement and the Detroit Income Stabilization Fund Program.  

The Reinventing Mi Retirement initiative was introduced by Governor Snyder in June 2014, and it focuses on providing financial education to help Michiganders better prepare for retirement. The initiative officially kicked off in October 2014 with eight locations in Michigan offering free informational sessions for community members. CPA members participated at locations across the state to provide free financial checkups, helping attendees gain a better understanding of budgeting and financial preparedness. Attendees also received an incredibly thorough financial toolkit, which our members contributed to as well. The event came together in just a few months due to the strong partnership we have with the State of Michigan and the incredible commitment of our member volunteers. We look forward to new initiatives planned in 2015, including events targeting younger people who maybe aren’t thinking about retirement yet, but need to be!

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Happy Financial Literacy Month

Fin Lit Month 2015Today, April 1, kicks off Financial Literacy Month. In addition to our year-round efforts, the AICPA, and CPAs across the country, participate in this annual event centered on improving Americans understanding of financial principles and practices. As part of this year’s festivities, 360 Degrees of Financial Literacy has launched a newly redesigned website with an updated set of tools and resources to better help Americans understand their personal finances and develop money management skills at every stage of life. 

Here are some of the other great, free events and resources to help your friends, family and clients improve their financial knowledge. 

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Reasoning with Reasonability

There is an abundance of terms and phrases that American’s use to make the act of savings feel less painful, like evaluating, bargaining, or prioritizing. But no matter how you phrase it, saving can be difficult for even the most responsible person, especially with matters that have a strong emotional component. For instance, when it comes to once in a lifetime events, like a wedding, people are much quicker to concede on their financial plan. In fact, according to The Knot's annual Real Weddings Study, the average cost of a wedding (excluding the honeymoon) reached an all-time high of $31,213 in 2014, up 4.5 percent from 2013. This is the fourth consecutive year of gains. 

Pig - MarriedWhile many argue that increased spending may reflect the improving economy, The Knot’s study showed that the increase in spending goes beyond inflation and was represented across all income levels and regions. Additionally, 45 percent of couples said they strayed from their wedding budget, and 23 percent said they didn't even have a budget to begin with. From a financial planning standpoint, it may seem unreasonable to spend outside your budget, but is it any more reasonable to ask someone to concede on such an important, emotional event? Where do you draw the line?

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Are You Cheating on Your Spouse Financially?

Couple financesDo you have a secret bank account or credit card that your spouse doesn't know about? Do you lie to your partner about how much you really spend? The topic of financial infidelity, whereby spouses lie to one another about money, emerged as one of the surprising topics of discussion at a recent meeting of the AICPA National CPA Financial Literacy Commission in Washington, DC. 

Commission members discussed a recent creditcards.com financial infidelity report that showed that about 20 percent of people admit to spending $500 or more without telling their significant other. According to the study, men are more likely to both spend more than $500 and have a secret account.

One way to prevent this is by setting aside some time with your partner (away from busy or stressful times) and having an open discussion about your spending and financial goals. Another solution offered was to have a joint account, but open separate accounts to make individual purchases. The key is having a trusting partner with whom you can have an honest and open dialogue about your finances.

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