James Schiavone Feed

James Schiavone

Media Relations Manager
American Institute of CPAs

Born and raised in New York City, James graduated from Tulane University with a BA in Sociology and English minor. In his role on the media relations team, he scours the news for articles relevant to the accounting profession and the finance industry. From the front page of the New York Times to obscure blogs in the back corners of the Internet, James finds the news CPAs need to know and shares it with them through the AICPANews Twitter account. He does proactive media outreach, tracks, analyzes and reports on the AICPA’s media activity and manages the AICPA’s Press Center.

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CPA Outlook Index Finds Increased Optimism for US Economy, Lowered Expectations Elsewhere

The AICPA’s CPA Outlook Index (CPAOI) fell four points in the first quarter, the first time the Index has dropped in more than two years. The Index, which polls chief executive officers, chief financial officers and controllers, found these executives were tempering their expectations for profit, revenue and expansion in the coming year.

Optimism about those key performance indicators still remains high, but the survey found a decline in sentiment since last quarter. The one survey measure to rise from the previous quarter was sentiment about the US economy, which found that 68 percent of respondents are now optimistic about the U.S. economy, a new high for the survey.

Continue reading "CPA Outlook Index Finds Increased Optimism for US Economy, Lowered Expectations Elsewhere" »

AICPA Announces 2015-2016 Legacy Scholarship Award Applications

The American Institute of CPAs recently announced that the AICPA Legacy Scholarship application is now available on ThisWayToCPA.com for the 2015-2016 academic year.

14089-331 AICPA Legacy Scholars Seal_color_FThe AICPA Legacy Scholars Program will provide more than 100 scholarships for the 2015-2016 academic year, totaling more than $380,000, to deserving undergraduate and graduate accounting students from across the nation. New this year is a more convenient, streamlined application process which allows students to fill out a single application for all four AICPA Legacy Scholarship awards.

“The AICPA has a long history of investing in the future of the profession by awarding scholarships to highly qualified accounting students,” said Joanne Fiore, AICPA vice president, professional media, pathways and inclusion.

Since 2011, the Institute has been awarding annual scholarships under the AICPA Legacy Scholars program umbrella, expanding the financial award to add a service component. The service aspect of the program is designed to help students develop the soft skills, including leadership and communications, needed to maintain a successful career. Scholarship recipients plan, promote and execute an eight-hour service project each semester. The service activity must relate to accounting, serve the community and be meaningful to the student.

“Our AICPA Legacy Scholars program helps students defray the cost of their education, while helping instill a commitment to public service that the accounting profession is known for,” Fiore added.

AICPA Legacy Scholars are Student Affiliate Members of the AICPA, a free membership option available to all currently enrolled college students. Each AICPA Legacy Scholar is assigned a coach to help guide the student’s service project and offer advice on questions related to the accounting profession. 

For more information, check out this short video 

  

The AICPA Legacy Scholars program comprises four distinct awards:

·         AICPA/Accountemps Student Scholarship

·         AICPA Foundation Two-Year Transfer Scholarship

·         AICPA John L. Carey Scholarship

·         AICPA Scholarship for Minority Accounting Students

Scholarship funding is provided by contributions from the AICPA Foundation, Robert Half International, Accountemps, the New Jersey Society of CPAs, the Accounting Education Foundation of the Texas Society of CPAs and the Virgin Islands Society of CPAs.

Students can apply online at ThisWayToCPA.com. The application deadline is April 1, 2015. For more information, contact scholarships@aicpa.org.

 

In the News: Students from UNLV Earn First Place in AICPA Accounting Competition

UNLV9_t653The American Institute of CPAs recently announced that students from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas have earned first place in the 2014 AICPA Accounting Competition.

AccountingWeb reports that the UNLV team’s top finish in the competition earned a $5,000 award for their school. Students from North Carolina State University placed second, taking home $3,000 for their university. The third-place team from the University of Southern Indiana earned $2,000 for their school.

In addition, each of the three finalist teams received a $10,000 award to be split among the team members. All of the awards are funded by the AICPA Foundation.

Continue reading "In the News: Students from UNLV Earn First Place in AICPA Accounting Competition" »

In the News: CPAs More Bullish on Economy Heading into 2015


2015Yesterday, the AICPA announced the results of the fourth quarter AICPA Economic Outlook Survey. The survey, which polls CEOs, CFOs, controllers and other CPAs who hold senior management accounting roles, found higher expectations for profits, revenue and expansion in the coming year.

Some 64 percent of survey takers now report that they are optimistic about prospects for the U.S. economy over the next 12 months. That is up from 52 percent last quarter and 38 percent a year ago.

As Politico reports, the survey found that respondents are actually slightly more optimistic about their own companies’ prospects (67 percent, up 2 percentage points from last quarter), with 71 percent saying they expect their business to expand in the coming year.

Continue reading "In the News: CPAs More Bullish on Economy Heading into 2015" »

AICPA in the News: Personal Finance Tips from CPAs

CPA Web-PFS_center_1cCPAs provide tremendous value in the area of financial planning by helping clients understand changes in laws, as well as trends which can affect their bottom line. Serving as trusted advisors, CPAs who work in personal financial planning are able to tailor their advice to meet the changing needs of their clients in an ever fluctuating economy.

Below are a few recent media articles highlighting the guidance of CPAs.

Jerry Love, CPA/PFS, responded to a Kiplinger’s Personal Finance reader who asked how to save for retirement if their employer doesn’t offer a 401(k).

If you have an eligible health insurance policy with at least a $1,250 deductible -- or $2,500 for family coverage -- you can contribute to a health savings account, said Love. You can contribute up to $3,300 in 2014 if you have individual coverage, or $6,550 for family coverage (plus $1,000 if 55 or older). Contributions are tax-deductible (or pretax) and can be used tax-free for medical expenses in any year.

Newsday reports that, with mortgage rates hovering around 4 percent, many Americans are considering purchasing a home. However, it is important to not rush to a lender until you're creditworthy. The best way to do that is to raise your credit score. AICPA member Kelley Long, CPA/PFS, advised that not applying for other loans or opening new credit cards would be one way to avoid damaging your credit score. In addition, not closing cards is a prudent step, because it reduces your available credit and therefore boosts the percentage of available credit your other cards represent.

A recent FoxBusiness.com article relied upon the expertise of two CPAs to shed light on the havoc financial fraud can cause the elderly. “If you’re 20 [years old] and something happens to you financially, you have a long time to make a difference “If you’re older and not able to go back to work and recover, having fraud perpetrated on you can significantly change the rest of your life,” said Mackey McNeill, CPA/PFS.

It can be difficult for those who are worried about their elders to gain more insight into their financial decisions to help prevent fraud, but Leonard Wright, CPA/PFS advises that effective communication can help break through. “There are ways to communicate with the elderly so they don’t feel like you’re taking over, said Wright. Tell your elderly loved ones that you can get a second opinion with finances just like you do with doctors.” This could also mean explaining the importance of calling another family member before sending any money to a third party or agreeing to a new contract, credit card or investment.

James Schiavone, Media Relations Manager, American Institute of CPAs. 

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