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AICPA in the News: Personal Finance Tips from CPAs

CPA Web-PFS_center_1cCPAs provide tremendous value in the area of financial planning by helping clients understand changes in laws, as well as trends which can affect their bottom line. Serving as trusted advisors, CPAs who work in personal financial planning are able to tailor their advice to meet the changing needs of their clients in an ever fluctuating economy.

Below are a few recent media articles highlighting the guidance of CPAs.

Jerry Love, CPA/PFS, responded to a Kiplinger’s Personal Finance reader who asked how to save for retirement if their employer doesn’t offer a 401(k).

If you have an eligible health insurance policy with at least a $1,250 deductible -- or $2,500 for family coverage -- you can contribute to a health savings account, said Love. You can contribute up to $3,300 in 2014 if you have individual coverage, or $6,550 for family coverage (plus $1,000 if 55 or older). Contributions are tax-deductible (or pretax) and can be used tax-free for medical expenses in any year.

Newsday reports that, with mortgage rates hovering around 4 percent, many Americans are considering purchasing a home. However, it is important to not rush to a lender until you're creditworthy. The best way to do that is to raise your credit score. AICPA member Kelley Long, CPA/PFS, advised that not applying for other loans or opening new credit cards would be one way to avoid damaging your credit score. In addition, not closing cards is a prudent step, because it reduces your available credit and therefore boosts the percentage of available credit your other cards represent.

A recent FoxBusiness.com article relied upon the expertise of two CPAs to shed light on the havoc financial fraud can cause the elderly. “If you’re 20 [years old] and something happens to you financially, you have a long time to make a difference “If you’re older and not able to go back to work and recover, having fraud perpetrated on you can significantly change the rest of your life,” said Mackey McNeill, CPA/PFS.

It can be difficult for those who are worried about their elders to gain more insight into their financial decisions to help prevent fraud, but Leonard Wright, CPA/PFS advises that effective communication can help break through. “There are ways to communicate with the elderly so they don’t feel like you’re taking over, said Wright. Tell your elderly loved ones that you can get a second opinion with finances just like you do with doctors.” This could also mean explaining the importance of calling another family member before sending any money to a third party or agreeing to a new contract, credit card or investment.

James Schiavone, Media Relations Manager, American Institute of CPAs. 

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