Advocacy Feed

Congress Capitol Building

The AICPA represents the CPA profession and its interests before the government and regulatory bodies. The AICPA regularly meets with the White House, Congress and regulators, such as the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Internal Revenue Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

AICPA representing you in 2018

GettyImages-622316560 - Advocacy2018 was a busy year for the AICPA’s Advocacy team. We were invited to testify before key congressional committees, provided written testimony to legislators and regulators and submitted over 60 comment letters to federal agencies and accounting standard-setters, including the Department of the Treasury, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Financial Accounting Standards Board. We also supported state CPA society activities in their legislatures.

Our efforts produced results. Here are just some of them:

Guidance on meals and entertainment deductions

Continue reading "AICPA representing you in 2018 " »

Licensure under fire in the states

GettyImages-159754158A powerful narrative is taking shape across the country that could define the future of licensure. State legislators are coming together to challenge the necessity and value of occupational licensing. 

So far, there have been no direct challenges to whether CPAs should be licensed. However, there’s a national anti-licensure legislative strategy that does not distinguish between occupations and learned professions such as CPAs.

The changing legislative environment means we risk losing licensure as a means to protect the public. That would mean no licensed architects, no licensed engineers and no licensed CPAs. We’ve spent decades ensuring that only qualified and educated professionals can hold out as CPAs. Clients trust CPAs to act as their fiduciaries because they know the profession is well regulated.

Continue reading "Licensure under fire in the states " »

Practitioners division can help IRS put taxpayers first

Shutterstock_1055588426“Wouldn’t you know IRS extended filing season an extra day the year I retire.”

- Nameless but real CPA

On April 17, what was supposed to be the final day for Americans to file 2017 tax returns, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) hardware issues resulted in the outage of several key online systems. The timing couldn’t have been worse. The website crash forced the IRS to delay the tax deadline by one day. It also served as a warning sign for those of us advocating for the agency’s modernization. And don’t tell that CPA that he actually got an extra three in his last busy season. Gravy, as it were.

The day after the technology collapse, the Taxpayer First Act — described as the most transformative revisions to the IRS in 20 years — won unanimous passage in the U.S. House of Representatives. The package of nine bills is intended to redesign the IRS to emphasize customer service, new taxpayer appeal rights, improved responsiveness to victims of identity theft and modernization of technology.

Continue reading "Practitioners division can help IRS put taxpayers first " »

Calling all CPAs – you should run for office

ElectionYou know that feeling you get when you’ve helped a client in a concrete way? Perhaps you saved them money on their taxes, identified waste or even fraud. Maybe you designed a plan to take their children through higher education, helped them save for retirement or protect themselves from loss. Possibly you advised a small business startup, or helped a larger company report on their cybersecurity controls.

What if you could take that feeling — and your service — to the next level?

When you’re a CPA, you have a solid understanding of the many issues that power government: taxes, their assessment and collection and the rules that govern them; small business challenges and needs; financial literacy and responsibility; and myriad details of budgeting, responsible record keeping and the impacts of financial decisions.

CPAs’ expertise gives them a distinct advantage over other candidates, making them uniquely qualified to serve as thought leaders in government. As the country ponders the effects of the first major tax overhaul in more than 30 years, now more than ever, there’s a need for tax and fiscal expertise in our public servants. Who better to serve the community and protect the public interest than CPAs?

Continue reading "Calling all CPAs – you should run for office" »

Tax Reform and Fairness – A Necessary Balance

Barry

We are fast approaching what many believe is crunch time for tax reform. There is a renewed push by the White House and Congress to enact tax reform by year’s end. President Trump is urging Congress to “move fast,” while the House and Senate work to identify a process to make it possible.

As the debate intensifies, policy goals will be fleshed out, trial balloons will be floated in the media, and key lawmakers will get down to business in assembling a package of reforms to the tax code that can pass muster in both chambers.

A mainstay of the tax reform discussions is a call for cuts in the corporate tax rate. Since the vast majority of U.S. businesses operate as pass-through businesses, tax reform plans have also applied the benefits of lower tax rates to certain pass-throughs. These pass-throughs, including S corporations and partnerships, don’t pay taxes themselves, but pass their earnings through to their owners who pay taxes at their individual rates.

Some in Washington have suggested that professional services pass-throughs – such as accounting firms – should not be treated like other businesses because of the mistaken belief they don’t help drive the economy. We know that’s not the case.

Continue reading "Tax Reform and Fairness – A Necessary Balance" »

Subscribe

Subscribe in a reader

Enter your Email:
Preview

CPA Letter Daily